Coram Deo ~

Looking at contemporary culture from a Christian worldview


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FAITH AND WORK: Connecting Sunday to Monday

Faith and Work News ~ Links to Interesting Articles

JOY!

  • How to Experience Joy in Your Work. Bill Peel writes “But joy also comes from employing the gifts God gave us. When we use our God-given abilities, we engage God’s creative power that He embedded in our soul. There is no deeper satisfaction than doing what God desires. His energy flows through the gifts He gave us and our soul knows this intuitively and responds in joy when our gifts are engaged.”
  • Joy is the Leading Indicator. Patrick Lencioni writes “I’ve come to the conclusion that the first sign of trouble on the horizon is a decrease in joy. Yes, joy. When people who work in an organization lose their sense of enjoyment and enthusiasm, it’s time to start making some changes.”
  • How to Find Joy in Your Work. Jon Bloom writes “The more we think about the whole first chapter of Genesis, the more glorious things we see regarding how God views hiswork, and the wonderful, liberating implications it has on how we are to view our

IN THE CHURCH:

  • Working for God’s Glory. This episode of The White Horse Inn features an address given by Michael Horton at the 2017 Ligonier National Conference. It addresses How are we to think about the church’s relationship to the secular world? Are believers called to be so heavenly minded that they completely avoid worldly activity? Or are we called to be salt and light as we love and serve our neighbors around us?” On this special edition of White Horse Inn,Michael Horton discusses these issues and more as he unpacks the distinction between The Great Commandment and The Great Commission.”

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FAITH AND WORK: Connecting Sunday to Monday

Faith and Work News ~ Links to Interesting Articles

FOR YOU EEYORES OUT THERE – YEAH YOU!EEYORE

  • Limits.  In this “Minute with Maxwell”, John Maxwell states that some people put limits on themselves, negatively impacting their ability to reach their potential.
  • 6 Things To Give Up If You Want To Be Effective. Kevin Lloyd shares 6 “conditions” he has noticed in people that limits their ability to make an impact.
  • In this “Minute from Maxwell”, John Maxwell states that the fruit of the tree is out on the limb. We need to quit hugging the tree trunk.
  • Essentials for a Flourishing Life. Stephen Graves gives four reasons why a long view of life is essential for a flourishing life.
  • 3 Ways to Unleash the Power of Determination. In this “Tuesday Tip”, Dr. Alan Zimmerman writes “Failures use their circumstance to give up, while successes use their circumstances as a reason to get going.  And determination is the resolve to meet every obstacle with the assurance that it can and will be overcome.”

MAKING AN IMPACT:impact

  • The Difference Between Your Job and Your Work. Dan Cumberland writes that “Your job is what you do to pay the bills while your work is about making an impact.”
  • 5 Things That Will Kill Your Impact. Stephen Graves writes “Impact is not just a power score or some random popularity contest. Nor is impact simply your online influence (i.e., Facebook likes). Impact is much deeper and long-lasting. It’s the change you bring about in the lives of others. It’s about changing the way people think, act, believe, live, purchase, and more.”

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4 Ways to Assure You Have Better Meetings

Patrick Lencioni Quote on MeetingsAttending poorly organized and managed meetings “weakens me”. The bad news is I’m in a lot of meetings each day at work, and I also attend meetings at church and with the professional IT organization in which I’m involved. Marcus Buckingham defines an activity that weakens us as one that drains us, bores us and is something on our calendars that we don’t look forward to.

Author and blogger Michael Hyatt shares this same weakness with me. He writes that he is weakened by long meetings of any kind. He states that he can focus intently for about two hours at the maximum. Then his attention begins to wander and he has to move on to something else or he actually becomes a distraction.

So what can we do to avoid creating meetings that weaken others? Here are 4 simple suggestions to help you have better meetings:

  1. First, identify a clear leader of the meeting. This is the person who is accountable for planning and leading a well-managed meeting.
  2. Second, have a clear purpose for the meeting. Everyone is busy and should know why the meeting needs to be held in the first place. I work with a leader who will often ask, “What problem are we trying to solve here?” That’s a great question and one we should keep in mind when planning meetings. If you don’t have enough content to cover in the meeting or the communication can be done via email, cancel the meeting and respect your attendees by giving them the time back to focus on other priority items.
  3. Next, develop an agenda for the meeting. This would include a clear starting and ending time. Request agenda topics ahead of time, including the specific person assigned to that topic, and the amount of time they will need for their topic. If in the meeting you find that a topic is going to take longer than expected, adjust the agenda (not the length of the meeting) to accommodate the need for additional time. You may have to delay discussion on some topics so that you can devote time to the topics that have the higher priority. At times, you may also have to make the decision to take discussions that will need more time, off-line.
  4. Finally, recap items agreed on. How many times do you leave a long meeting and not really know what the outcome was, or what the next steps were? I think that happens a lot. Patrick Lencioni helpfully suggests that at the end of every meeting take a few minutes to ensure that everyone is walking away with the same understanding about what has been agreed to and what they are committed to.

These are just a few suggestions I have to help you run better meetings. Meetings are necessary for many reasons, so let’s make the ones we run the very best. What suggestions do you have to add to this list?