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Looking at contemporary culture from a Christian worldview


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FAITH AND WORK: Connecting Sunday to Monday

Faith and Work News ~ Links to Interesting Articles

  • Vocation in Retirement. Gene Veith writes “Retiring from the workplace is allowing me to pursue my other vocations and to love and serve my other neighbors in ways that I had neglected.”
  • Why You Can’t Measure the Value of Homemaking.  Andrew Spencer writes “All work that honors God’s design has inherent value; it is good work. Homemaker, engineer, athlete, artist, and janitor all have the potential to fulfill God’s purpose for the world and enhance the common good.”
  • Called to the Cubicle: Regardless of Where We Work We’re All in Full-Time Ministry. Daniel Darling writes “No matter what we do for a living, we’re engaged in full-time Christian ministry from nine to five each day. The cubicle is not a prison but an altar, and knowing that should radically change how we think about the place where we spend a large part of our adult lives.”
  • If He Calls You, He Will Equip You. Stacy Reaoch writes “God often stretches us beyond what we think is possible. He calls us to tasks that seem greater than our capabilities. If you’re in a place of insecurity today, wondering how you’re going to handle the assignment given to you, remember three things.”

  • Servant Leadership Characteristics and Why They are Effective. Maren Fox writes “Nearly 50 years after Robert K. Greenleaf pioneered servant leadership, its key characteristics speak more to today’s workforce than any generation before. He wrote that the servant leader “focuses on the growth and well-being of people and the communities to which they belong.”
  • Servant.  In this “Minute with Maxwell”, John Maxwell states that a servant is someone who is mature and puts the interests of others above themselves.
  • The Servant Formula for Succeeding in Business. Sarah Stanley writes “Greenleaf’s “best test” for servant leaders is if their employees and mentees go on to become leaders, ideally servant leaders, themselves.”

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FAITH AND WORK: Connecting Sunday to Monday

Faith and Work News ~ Links to Interesting Articles

REST & MANAGING YOUR ENERGY:

  • The Power of Deep Rest. Tim Keller writes “To understand this deep rest we need to look at the biblical meaning of the Sabbath—to understand what it is a sign of, and what it points to.”
  • Burnout Is Not a Calling. Scotty Smith prays “Being poured out is a gospel thing; being burned out is a foolish thing.”
  • 7 Secrets to Being a High Achiever. Ron Edmondson writes “I get asked frequently how I am able to get so much done and still take care of myself and my family.”

CHARACTER MATTERS:

  • Impacting Your Workplace Starts with Your Character. Art Lindsley writes “If we want to cultivate character in ourselves that is a blessing to our workplaces, families, and communities, we have to start with our thoughts and resolve to act in a different manner.”
  • Why Curiosity Matters So Much in the Workplace. Barnabas Piper writes “When you think of curiosity –if you think of curiosity – you might picture exploring the mountaintops or reading books or exploring new places. But how does curiosity fit and, more importantly, why does it matter in the workplace? In productivity? In business and commerce and trade? Since most of us spend the bulk of our waking hours in these contexts it is worth considering.”
  • Turning the Tide on the Rudeness in the Workplace. John Kyle writes “Paul’s description of love in 1 Corinthians 13:4-7 is a guide to how we are to love at work—love is patient, kind, not envious, not boastful, not arrogant, not rude, etc.”
  • The Biggest Hindrance in a Leader’s Growth. Eric Geiger writes that a lack of self-awareness is the biggest hindrance to a leader’s development.
  • How Do You Show Patience at Work and Still Be Productive? John Kyle writes “Even with the harsh realities of the workplace, we are called to love with a genuine love. Ultimately, Jesus showed us how to love. We can’t love perfectly as he did, but we can follow him and learn his moves.”
  • The Humble Leader. Eric Geiger writes “Leadership is often very humbling, and leadership is most dangerous when it ceases to be.”

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FAITH AND WORK: Connecting Sunday to Monday

Faith and Work News ~ Links to Interesting Articles

JOY!

  • How to Experience Joy in Your Work. Bill Peel writes “But joy also comes from employing the gifts God gave us. When we use our God-given abilities, we engage God’s creative power that He embedded in our soul. There is no deeper satisfaction than doing what God desires. His energy flows through the gifts He gave us and our soul knows this intuitively and responds in joy when our gifts are engaged.”
  • Joy is the Leading Indicator. Patrick Lencioni writes “I’ve come to the conclusion that the first sign of trouble on the horizon is a decrease in joy. Yes, joy. When people who work in an organization lose their sense of enjoyment and enthusiasm, it’s time to start making some changes.”
  • How to Find Joy in Your Work. Jon Bloom writes “The more we think about the whole first chapter of Genesis, the more glorious things we see regarding how God views hiswork, and the wonderful, liberating implications it has on how we are to view our

IN THE CHURCH:

  • Working for God’s Glory. This episode of The White Horse Inn features an address given by Michael Horton at the 2017 Ligonier National Conference. It addresses How are we to think about the church’s relationship to the secular world? Are believers called to be so heavenly minded that they completely avoid worldly activity? Or are we called to be salt and light as we love and serve our neighbors around us?” On this special edition of White Horse Inn,Michael Horton discusses these issues and more as he unpacks the distinction between The Great Commandment and The Great Commission.”

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FAITH AND WORK: Connecting Sunday to Monday

Faith and Work News ~ Links to Interesting Articles

YOUR WORK MATTERS TO GOD

your-work-matters

  • God’s Work; Our Work. Amy Sherman writes “In the midst of the tedium that inevitably accompanies any job (in varying degrees), it can be easy to wonder at times whether our work really matters. One way of battling the temptation to believe the lie that our work doesn’t matter is to see the connections between what we do each day and what God is doing from day to day.”
  • Tent-Making Is Not Second-Class. Tom Nelson writes “A closer look at 1 Thessalonians reveals that one connecting thread flowing from Paul’s inspired pen is a robust understanding and affirmation of Christian vocation. Indeed, vocational diligence is one of the letter’s main literary themes.”
  • Vocation is Integral. Steven Garber was the speaker at my Covenant Seminary graduation. “Many people today see their job as nothing more than a paycheck. But is one’s calling more than that? Steven Garber says yes. He says there is an intimate connection between one’s faith, vocation, and culture. “Vocation is integral,” he says, “not incidental to the missio Dei.” Steven explains how most of what God is doing in the world happens in and through the vocations of his people.”
  • On Calling, Ambition and Surrender. “Many of us struggle to discern our role in God’s bigger plan for the world; some of us even struggle to see God’s plan at all. We’re unsure of our purpose, or uncertain of how we can use that purpose to bring renewal to our communities. Pete Richardson helps executive, church, and cultural leaders hone in on their life purpose and perspective. He reveals some of the questions we need to ask ourselves, and the results we can expect when we respond to God’s very personal assignment for each of us.”
  • Working for God’s Glory. I’m looking forward to Michael Horton’s session on the doctrine of vocation at the 2017 Ligonier National Conference. Here’s a description of the session “Reformation extends to all matters of life, including theology, church, home, and society. This session will outline the doctrine of vocation and explain how it relates to other doctrines such as the priesthood of all believers, with a view toward encouraging greater faithfulness, innovation, and productivity in the workplace and beyond. It will consider why glorifying God in our callings is vital to the kingdom of God for future centuries.”vocation
  • Why Do People Work? Anne Bradley writes “You are created uniquely and have something to offer to the world.  You have a real contribution to make through your work and that contribution can have lasting significance for the Kingdom of Christ, even if you are flipping burgers.”
  • Connecting to a Higher Purpose – Especially at Work. Hugh Whelchel writes “Understanding our calling is not just about finding purpose in our work but finding purpose in everything we do – understanding that we are on a mission for God.”
  • The Fruit of the Spirit and Your Work. Matt Perman writes “And, this also helps us see why our work matters. For when we are doing our work, we aren’t just doing work. We are engaging in an opportunity to display the fruit of the Spirit and manifest the character of God all day long, right here in the concrete realities of everyday life.”
  • Your Work Matters. Watch this sermon from John MacArthur from 2 Thessalonians 3: 6-15.
  • Five Aims in Vocation. Amy Sherman writes “while it’s difficult to say with precision what career a particular Christian should take up, it is possible to suggest some overarching vocational aims to pursue. Here are five—each with a story to illustrate.”
  • Discovering the Reformation View of Work. Hugh Whelchel writes “It was initially through Martin Luther’s efforts that the 16th century Reformers began to recover the biblical doctrine of work. They began to recognize that all of life, including daily work, can be understood as a calling from God.”
  • The Historical Influences of the Sacred-Secular Divide. Hugh Welchel writes “Finding significance in our work requires that we once again overcome the sacred-secular divide and embrace a biblical view of work.”

REAL-LIFE EXAMPLES:

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FAITH AND WORK: Connecting Sunday to Monday

Faith and Work News ~ Links to Interesting Articles

your-work-matters

  • 3 Ingredients to Greater Satisfaction and Impact at Work. Dan Anderson writes “In this post, let’s consider a second key ingredient to achieving greater satisfaction and impact at work: contentment.”
  • When It Comes to a Job Well Done, God Is in the Details. Andrew Spencer writes “No matter how small the task appears, it is worthy of being done well. Regardless of where your job falls on the org chart, you have the opportunity to contribute to the company and the glory of God through a job well-done.”
  • How We Participate in God’s Own Work. Joe Carter writes “A key step in being “happy in our toil” is to recognize which vocation model our work most reflects—and recognizing that such work has value.”
  • 5 Bad Starting Points for the Faith and Work Conversation. Jeff Haanen writes “The death and resurrection of Jesus, and the far reaching effects of salvation “as far as the curse is found,” is the best place to start the conversation about faith and work.”
  • Doing Good Work that Matters Doesn’t Happen Accidentally. Matt Perman writes “We have to be intentional in making plans for the welfare of others. And then we have to be proactive in carrying those plans out.”
  • Retirement Reexamined. James Clark writes “We should be always ready for the work God has placed in front of us, before retirement and beyond it, for God’s call does not fade over time, but beckons us ever onward for as long as we live.”
  • Katherine Leary Alsdorf: We’re Made to Work. Katherine Leary Alsdorf worked with Tim Keller on the excellent book Every Good Endeavor. Read this interview with her from Faith & Leadership about the book and the challenges of integrating work and faith.
  • Working Well. In part one of his two articles on work, Tim Challies writes “Whether you are an employee or an employer, a manager or a line-worker, a tradesman or a Wall Street executive (that’s Bay Street here in Canada), you will benefit by hearing three instructions from God as given by Paul.”
  • Wait for Payday. In part two, Tim Challies writes “Paul says that you are to complete your work (“render your service”) with a good will. That is quite the command because it indicates that not only does God expect you to do good work, but he expects you to have to have a good attitude while you do it.”
  • No Job’s Too Small for Jesus. Courtney Reissig writes “In the Lord Jesus, every single act of work you do is never wasted, because in him you are showing the world what it means to be loved, cared for, and welcomed into a family.”
  • 14 Rules for a Godly Employee. Jordan Standridge writes “As believers we know that our calling is higher. We do work for men, but ultimately it is God whom we serve. As we work hard we are ultimately declaring our belief in the Gospel, and our hope in eternity.”

workplace-wisdom

  • Wisdom for the Workplace. Listen to this teaching series from John MacArthur, based on 2 Thessalonians 3: 6-15. The series description is “In Wisdom for the Workplace, John MacArthur brings practical, biblical perspective to your career—whatever it is. Discover the keys to genuine job satisfaction, and see how your career can have a vital, eternal impact for the kingdom of God.”
  • How to See Productivity from a Biblical Perspective. Hugh Welchel writes “So how can Christians see productivity from a biblical perspective? First, by recognizing that productivity isn’t morally neutral – in fact, it’s just the opposite. Second, by seeing the bigger picture of productivity within God’s plan for creation.”

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FAITH AND WORK: Connecting Sunday to Monday

Faith and Work News ~ Links to Interesting Articles

LEADERS AND LEADERSHIP:Third Serving Leader Quote

  • Character Matters in Public Leadership. Denny Burk writes “This morning I was thinking about our current political moment and about the nation’s indiffernce to moral character in public leadership. I was reminded of a short essay that John Piper wrote nearly twenty years ago during the impeachment scandal. The essay was such a beacon of prophetic moral clarity then. I think it still is now. And it is relevant to our current moment.”
  • 10 Prices You Must Be Willing to Pay to Be a Great Leader. Brian Dodd, in writing about Yadier Molina, my favorite baseball player, states that Molina provides a good template for the price needed for successful leadership.
  • 3 Actions of Servant Leaders. Eric Geiger writes “Situational leadership is Christian in nature because it calls the leader to serve each person, not to ask each person to serve the leader.”
  • A Leader’s Critical Skill. Dave Kraft writes “Probably no skill would be more helpful to develop than that of being an excellent communicator.”
  • 7 of the Hardest People to Lead. Ron Edmondson writes “I’ve also learned some people are easier to lead than others. Often personalities, experiences and preferences negatively impact a person’s ability to be led effectively.”
  • How Leaders Accomplish More by Doing Less. Matt Perman writes “One of the most helpful books that I’ve read on leading in an organization is Scott Eblin’s The Next Level: What Insiders Know About Executive Success.
  • The Five Marks of Authentic Leadership. In speaking of leadership, Michael Hyatt writes that it “certainly includes influence, but that’s only part of the package. I believe leadership includes at least five characteristics.”
  • 7 Qualities of Good Change Agent Leaders. Ron Edmondson writes “If you want to be in leadership get comfortable with change. It’s part of the experience of every leader. The best leaders get accustomed to leading change.”
  • 10 Ways to Elevate Your Leadership Level. Brad Lomenick writes “It’s the middle of the year, and as such, here are 10 reminders and ways to raising your leadership level. Hopefully these motivate you as well as inspire and challenge your team.”
  • 3 Types of Leaders. Steve Graves writes “The three common leaders are: launch-the-business leader, run-the-business leader, and change-the-business leader.”
  • Wandering Around. You may remember hearing about “Management by Walking Around” years ago. Dan Rockwell has some good thoughts for leaders about wandering around.
  • Biblical Leaders Consistently Say 5 Things. Dave Kraft writes “Leaders use lots of words in carrying out their responsibilities. They are communicators, talkers, vision-casters and exhorters; they should also be above average in listening. Here are 5 things leaders consistently say if they are truly excellent leaders.”
  • Leadership and the Power of Hope. Dr. Alan Zimmerman writes “Never deprive someone of hope. It may be all he has.”

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FAITH AND WORK: Connecting Sunday to Monday

Faith, Work and Leadership News ~ Links to Interesting Articles

YOUR WORK MATTERS!Hugh Welchel Quote

  • Do God’s Will, Not His Work. Bethany Jenkins writes “Let us, therefore, work, count, invest, measure, and report. But may we find no trust or identity in it.”
  • Seven Reasons Your Work Matters. Austin Burkhart writes “Many followers of Jesus live under the illusion that their work is not as important and God-honoring as the work of others. We’ve neglected Martin Luther’s teaching that all Christians are priests, regardless of occupation. Instead, we’ve created a hierarchy of jobs ranging from the most “spiritual” to the least.”
  • 8 Things My Workaholism is Causing Me. Chuck Lawless writes “I admit it: this blog post is both a confession and request for prayer. I’m a workaholic, and I know it.”
  • Three Reasons Evangelism Isn’t the Sole Reason for Your Work (but It’s Still Important). Hugh Whelchel writes “When we through faith embrace Christ, we should also be led to embrace the cultural mandate. We should all bring our faith and a desire to obey Christ into our daily work.”
  • How to Achieve Greatness. Steve Graves writes “The single most important muscle involved in this process is perseverance. It is a muscle that all great people have developed well.”
  • 8 Reasons You’re Exhausted, Overwhelmed, and Unproductive. Michael Hyatt writes “From where I sit there are eight workplace vitals we can check to establish a baseline of health.”
  • When a Pastor is also a Police Officer. Jason Cook interviews Brandon Murphy, a pastor and deputy sheriff in a large Southern city about how his faith integrates with his work.
  • The Power of Recognition. Alan Zimmerman writes “Most people work just hard enough to not get fired and get paid just enough money not to quit.  But proper recognition, given the right way, can change all that.”
  • Your Personal Mission Statement Action Plan. Here is a free Personal Mission Statement guidebook that he states will help you “Declare to the world who you are, whom you serve, and why you matter”.
  • chance-the-rapper-artWhat Drake and Chance the Rapper Teach Us about Finding Fulfillment in Our Work. Alexander Bouffard writes “Two of the biggest hip-hop albums of the year, Drake’s Views and Chance the Rapper’s Coloring Book, were released within a month of each other (April and May, respectively). We can learn a thing or two about finding fulfillment in our work by comparing them.”
  • The Most Important Reason We Work. Phillip Holmes writes “In order to shift our misplaced motivation (to work), we need a theology of work.”
  • How Vocation Brings Dignity to Your Work. Tim Challies writes “No matter what your vocations are, they all carry the same great purpose: to do good to others and bring glory to God.”
  • The Power—and Danger—in Luther’s Concept of Work. I enjoyed two wonderful classes with Dan Doriani at Covenant Seminary. Here he writes “Martin Luther probably did more than any Protestant to establish the theology of work many Christians embrace today. Like no theologian before him, he insisted on the dignity and value of all labor. Luther did more than break the split between sacred and secular work—he empowered all believers to know their work served humanity and enjoyed God’s full blessing.”
  • Why Pastors Need to Help Their People Connect Faith and Work. This post from Made to Flourish states “Is it really the responsibility of pastors to teach their people how to connect their faith and work? There are two pressing factors that indicate that the answer is “yes.” In fact, this is both an urgent and important need.”

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